EVERYONE HAS A TALE – THE KEY TIMING TO CHANGE THE LOCKS

13 Feb EVERYONE HAS A TALE – THE KEY TIMING TO CHANGE THE LOCKS

Re-keying locks, you meet all kinds of people in somewhat similar of situations. One of the most common is a change in the relationship of the people living there.

Anne, a nurse with an underemployed, excessively partying and vacant husband, went through a separation. She owned the house. “It was…unpleasant,” she said. She felt compelled to call a residential locksmith to change the locks to prevent any altercations.

Susan, a retail manager, had a falling out with her roommate. Susan owned the condo. The roommate’s rent was supposed to help with the mortgage payment but the roommate wasn’t paying. The homeowners’ association recently had increased the monthly dues putting more pressure on Susan.

Then there were the personal differences.

“She kept deleting my shows off of our DVR,” Susan went on. “After five months, I had no choice. I needed someone who’d pay, had reached my personal limit…I had to evict her.” Next she changed the locks.

Ted Spiel, an attorney, rented out his former home in his hometown of Minneapolis. Spiel lives in Denver now. He had rented his property out to what wound up being a bunch that, too, failed to pay rent. Worse, after sending his sister to check on the 3-bedroom house, he discovered that the tenants had trashed the place. After eviction, the next step he had the place repaired and the locks re-keyed.

No one is alone in having unfortunate circumstances that need to lead to new beginnings, and sometimes that begins with the locks.

So when SHOULD you have locks re-keyed?

 

SECURITY AFTER AN EVICTION

In our own informal survey, 10 out of 10 current or former renters had no idea how if their apartment locks had ever been changed.  Eighty percent of maintenance and property managers reported they never changed apartment locks unless a tenant was evicted or some other security concern.

WHEN THE DOORKNOB OR PINS FAIL

Property managers reported that they rekeyed locks when the pins failed. Alternatively they changed the entire lockset.

SENIOR RESIDENTIAL SECURITY

The leading residential category to change the apartment/unit keys and fob codes is senior living facilities. “We changed the locks on the units between each tenant,” reported J.R., a former facilities manager for a senior care community. “And we changed the fob codes to access certain building areas and amenities every three months.”

BETWEEN EVERY TENANT

In this litigious age, the more you can do to prevent a lawsuit or liability in the first place, the better. The cost to re-key an apartment or condo lock is substantially less than if a tenant gets robbed, in an altercation with an intruder – or goodness forbid – worse, as a result of a former tenant’s key.  It just makes sense to change the locks between renters.

What about master keys, particularly for larger communities with larger staff?

Our survey showed that most multi-unit buildings don’t have a policy in place to change master lock pins/keys and little more than a sign-out sheet is used to prove who has had access to master key copy. CONSIDER REQUIRING MASTER KEYS BEING SIGNED OUT DAILY. Should anything happen, this limits the window of time a master key could have been used, and who might have it.

In addition to re-keying due to evictions, lock wear-and-tear, buying a new home, and renting out a home to new renters, another cause of changing the lock(s) is due to lost keys, including masters. It’s another reason to keep an organized system of managing keys.

If you need to have some locks re-keyed, including for master keys and commercial locksmith service, as well as residential locksmith service, contact Alexius Locksmith.

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