Defending Your Home: Consumer Reports Deadbolt Lock Testing

14 Feb Defending Your Home: Consumer Reports Deadbolt Lock Testing

A woman named Anne works 12-hour shifts as an oncology nurse. She provides medical treatment, empathy and gold old fashioned tender loving care to those going through cancer. She deals with unpleasant to downright disgusting situations, and often has to lift patients. The point is she works hard for her happy home, located in an “up and coming” neighborhood.

As with her work, Anne has put much TLC into improving her home and community. She helps her neighbors, especially an ailing senior war vet next door.  She’s a good egg, in general.

A secure home is a big deal to Anne. She’s one of those home improvement buffs, spending most of her free putting on fresh coats of paint, adding landscaping to the front or gardening in the back. She loves to travel, but also really loves her home.

Her upbringing was without a stable home. She spent many periods of her childhood crashing on couches and other temporary, emergency accommodations. A nice, safe home is very important to Anne, indeed.

Unfortunately, she came home from one shift to find her happy home in shambles, ransacked and a big, dust-framed square of white wall where her flatscreen had been. Her neighborhood suffered a series of burglaries over the following weeks.

Time to call Denver’s locksmiths.

Since criminals don’t think about the fact that maybe they’re burglarizing a cancer nurse do-gooder, let’s go over where her lock failed and discuss the Consumer Reports Deadbolt Test.

In the case of Anne’s lock failure, there were two issues:

  • An amateur handyman had installed the new door, door knob and deadbolt. He used the screws that had been provided with the lock/strikeplate, which were too short to penetrate beyond trim into the actual door frame.
  • He had used a cheap lock with bolt that was easily kicked in and loose, along with the strikeplate.

If you want your lock expertly installed, please folks, call a residential locksmith, like Alexius Locksmith

When it comes to lock vulnerability there are three primary categories:

  • Failure to withstand a kick-in breaking and entering
  • Vulnerability to being picked
  • Drilling vulnerability

Consumer Reports recommends using a box-reinforced strike plate or other doorframe reinforcement.  It’s tough to defend against drilling, they also pointed out.

HOW THEY WERE TESTED

Beyond beefing up your door and frame, you want a good lock. The following is how Consumer Reports rated 17 different locks – based on testing each for the three most common lock failure vulnerabilities during a break in.

In the event of a tie in performance-based score, price was the deciding factor.

Here’s how various locks ranked according to the report:

 

RANK BRAND/MODEL OVERALL SCORE NOTES
1 Medeco

Maxum 11*603

97 Highest possible rating for kick-in, drilling and picking resistance
2 Kwikset

980

83 Highest possible rating for kick-in and picking resistance, but weak drilling resistance
3 Baldwin

Prestige 380

82 Highest possible rating for kick-in and picking resistance, but weak drilling resistance
4 Falcon

D241

78 Highest possible rating for kick-in resistance, good picking resistance, but weak drilling resistance
5 Schlage

B60N 505 605

69 Highest possible rating for kick-in resistance, weakest possible rating for drilling resistance, and good picking resistance

 

6 Schlage

BE365 V CAM 619

 

53
7 Emtek

8455

 

52
8 Kwikset

909

 

49
9 Defiant

DL71

 

44
10 iTouchless

BM002U

 

38
11 Arrow

E61

 

37
12 Tru-Guard

DL71 KA3

 

32
13 Master Lock

5261D

 

22
14 Gatehouse

DLX71

 

19
15 Kwikset

660

 

19
16 Prime-Line

Segal SE 15361

 

19
17 Weslock

671

17

 

For recommendations, replacements or an at-home appointment, contact denverslocksmisths.com.

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